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Peru

In Peru, the Transformative Pathways project is focused on strengthening indigenous people’s initiatives for protecting biodiversity and governing their territories in the Andean-Amazon regions. This is done through the application – and documentation – of traditional Andean-Amazonian agroecological approaches and territory-based provisioning systems. 

Key participants in this country’s project are the Wampis in the regions of Amazonas and Loreto (Northern Amazon), the Yanesha people in Pasco (Selva Central), and the Quechua people in Ayacucho. 

The project in Peru is implemented by two organisations – The Autonomous Territorial Government of The Wampis Nation (GTANW) and CHIRAPAQ, Centre of Indigenous Cultures of Peru.

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Sunset over Wampis village of Soledad, Peru. Credit Vicki Brown, FPP

Executive Summary: Baseline study of the legal framework of land rights and ancestral knowledge of indigenous peoples and local communities in Peru

This study examines the recognition of the land rights and ancestral knowledge of indigenous peoples and local communities in Peru. It systematically analyses the relevant national and sub-national legal framework, judicial and administrative decisions, relevant public policies and interviews with representatives of indigenous peoples’ organisations.…
13.12.23
Press Release
Crias de taricaya y charapa en artesas CC.NN. Puerto Juan

Wampís to release aquatic turtles in the Kankaim Basin, Morona

The Autonomous Territorial Government of the Wampis Nation (GTANW), through the management groups of the San Juan, Puerto Juan, Sánchez Cerro, and San Francisco de Chiwaza communities in the Morona District, Datem del Marañón Province, will be releasing 3,205 hatchlings of Yellow-spotted river turtles “Taricaya”…
04.12.23
Article
Wampis woman planting taricaya eggs, in the Puerto Juan Indigenous Community.

Recovering aquatic turtles in the Kankaim Basin, Morona

The taricaya and the charapa are the two most important species of aquatic turtles due to the contribution of their eggs and meat in the diet of the local population, as well as a source of economic income from the commercialisation of these natural products.…
01.09.23
Article

Processes promoted in the family

In June 2022, we began the implementation of the Transformative Pathways project, which works to support Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities to lead and scale up conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity. These actions will also serve to conserve and protect the natural environments where…
01.09.23
Article
Fiorella (37) and her daughter Yuliana (9) select the best cedar seeds that they store to reforest the edge of their plots.

“Inside the forest instead of planting, trees are being cut down”.

Fiorella Lopez Manchari is a 37-year-old Yanesha woman who lives in Unión de la Selva, Peru. Fiorella grew up with her grandmother until the age of seven when she had to migrate to Lima to work.   "All my life I have always liked to generate…
21.08.23
Article

Showcase on Indigenous contributions to biodiversity conservation

Transformative Pathways website launches The Transformative Pathways website, launched on the International Day of the World's Indigenous Peoples 2023, is a platform to evidence indigenous peoples and local communities’ work safeguarding biodiversity across the globe. The website is a repository of information to ensure that…
09.08.23

Further info

Key Activities

  • Supporting community-based monitoring and communal territorial governance systems
  • Regenerating biodiversity and strengthening communal food sovereignty, livelihoods and traditional occupations
  • Application of Andean-Amazonian agroecological approaches, including reforestation and recovery of endangered animal and plant species
  • Scoping studies and strategies to develop territory-based provisioning systems for food, water, livelihoods and waste management
  • Intergenerational knowledge sharing, education of indigenous youth around protection of traditional knowledge, territory and responding to current socio-ecological challenges
  • Advocacy and national-level dialogues around laws and proposals relating to biodiversity and indigenous peoples’ territories
  • Supporting indigenous communities to document and share experiences
  • Promoting the inclusion of indigenous community-led initiatives in CBD (e.g. contributions to NBSAPs) and the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) processes
Imiarus sign agreement, 19 March 2021. Photo by Diego Benavente Marchán / GTANW
Imiarus sign agreement, 19 March 2021. Photo by Diego Benavente Marchán / GTANW
Fiorella López Manchari (37 years old) of the Yanesha people grows vegetables in her family's bio-garden. Unión de La Selva Native Community, district of Villa Rica, province of Oxapampa, Pasco region, Peru.
Fiorella López Manchari (37 years old) of the Yanesha people grows vegetables in her family’s bio-garden. Unión de La Selva Native Community, district of Villa Rica, province of Oxapampa, Pasco region, Peru. Photo: Luisenrrique Becerra Velarde / CHIRAPAQ.