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Indigenous Information Network (IIN)

Indigenous Information Network (IIN) works on development issues that impact Indigenous Peoples and local communities with a main focus on women, children, youth and other vulnerable members of our communities. IIN recognizes that “conservation and protection of Our Environment is key since it is that environment we depend on for survival”. 

IIN is a non-profit, volunteer-run non-governmental organisation (NGO) registered in the Republic of Kenya. The organisation was founded in 1996 by a group of professionals in response to addressing the need for information through media and other channels about Indigenous Peoples, their livelihoods, and their struggle to exist. 

The organisation has been involved in dissemination of information, environmental conservation activities, community development, and advocacy activities in support of Indigenous Peoples, women, girls and boys, youth and other isolated minorities in the region. 

Country: Kenya
Website: Indigenous Information Network
Twitter: IIN Kenya
Facebook: IIN Kenya

Dialogue discussion among the Samburu community of Kiltamany on how they are going to work towards restoring biodiversity. Photo by Indigenous Information Network (IIN)
Dialogue discussion among the Samburu community of Kiltamany on how they are going to work towards restoring biodiversity. Photo by Indigenous Information Network (IIN)
Maasai Indigenous women carrying out restoration activity by nurturing their tree nursery in Transmara. Photo by Indigenous Information Network (IIN)
Maasai Indigenous women carrying out restoration activity by nurturing their tree nursery in Transmara. Photo by Indigenous Information Network (IIN)

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Main areas of work

  • Environmental conservation with a focus on different multilateral agreements, at the local, national, regional and international levels. 
  • Health issues, including sexual reproductive health. 
  • Women’s rights and gender mainstreaming. 
  • Education which includes girl-child education. 
  • Water issues promote access to clean water by harvesting the rain, protecting natural sources. We strongly believe without clean water, there is no good health for the communities. 
  • Economic empowerment which includes fundraising, for the communities we work with, especially women and the youth. 
  • Protection and preservation of traditional knowledge, language and cultural practices. 
  • Land rights with a key focus on women’s rights, access and ownership of land and property. 
  • Sustainable development with a focus on sustainable development goals (SDGs). 
Training workshop at Naramam on biodiversity conservation and sustainable livelihood. Photo by Photo by Indigenous Information Network (IIN)
Samburu Indigenous Peoples doing Community Resource Mapping at Kiltamany. Photo by Indigenous Information Network (IIN)

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Areas of work proposed in the Pathways project

IIN’s role is to help create an enabling environment, especially through the implementation of on the ground projects and through ensuring communities understand their land rights. 

As well as this, IIN collaborates with the Chepkitale Indigenous Peoples Development Project (CIPDP) in engaging the Kenyan government in the implementation of the framework of the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity. 

Together they work to increase the recognition of these communities as custodians of fauna and flora, and to strengthen the efforts of communities to restore and protect their lands and to shape the national policies. 

A degraded land in Naramam which we look forward to restore before the end of the project. Photo by Indigenous Information Network (IIN)
A degraded land in Naramam which we look forward to restore before the end of the project. Photo by Indigenous Information Network (IIN)

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Related posts

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Project Update April 2024

This Project Update, published in April 2024, brings together updates from the Transformative Pathways partners on their key activities and work undertaken since the start of the project in 2022.   Capacity building sessions on biodiversity monitoring have been a key part of the first phase…
11.04.24
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Learning new skills on planting and restoration to achieve food security. Photo credits: IIN

Food sovereignty in Maasai, Samburu and Pokot communities in relation to their traditional knowledge

The Maasai, Samburu and Pokot are semi nomadic pastoralist communities in Kenya who migrate within semi- arid lowlands to obtain water and pasture for their livestock. Their lifestyle centres around their cattle which constitute their primary source of food, and for them wealth is measured…
02.04.24
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Second Transformative Pathways In-Person Meeting 

In February 2024, twelve project partners of the Transformative Pathways consortium gathered for the second in-person planning and review meeting at Laboot, Chepkitale in Kenya. The meeting hosted nearly 80 participants, including representatives of all organisations, and local community members of the Ogiek of Mt…
02.04.24